Nurse claims she was fired after reporting allegations

Ingersoll Place Assisted Living and Memory Care on Consaul Road in Niskayuna. Photo by Peter R. Barber/Gazette photographerIngersoll Place Assisted Living and Memory Care on Consaul Road in Niskayuna. Photo by Peter R. Barber/Gazette photographer

BY STEVEN COOK
Gazette Reporter

NISKAYUNA — A nurse who worked at Ingersoll Place in Niskayuna claims she was fired from the assisted-living facility last year in retaliation for reporting to the state allegations made by a patient against a fellow nurse.

Kristin Beaver, a Schenectady County resident, filed the suit in late January in state Supreme Court in Schenectady County seeking unspecified damages.

She claims that after being employed there for just over a year and never having been subject to discipline previously, she was fi red days after she first reported abuse allegations made by a patient against the fellow nurse.

The suit does not detail the allegations against the fellow nurse, but contends the fellow nurse’s alleged actions “constituted an imminent threat” or “appeared to constitute an imminent threat” to the patient.

Beaver is seeking various damages, as well as lost wages, and an order reinstating her to her position.

A spokeswoman for Ingersoll Place, located on Consaul Road, declined to comment on the suit or allegations, saying the issue has been referred to Ingersoll’s legal counsel.

After Beaver reported the allegation to her superiors, the suit reads, the fellow nurse continued in her position. Beaver then reported the allegations to the state Department of Health. The day after that report, the home suspended Beaver, and two days later terminated her.

The Department of Health investigated the report, the suit contends, and “upon information and belief, the Department of Health determined that the report of abuse of Patient was founded.”

Beaver is represented by Albany attorney Amanda R. Stern, who declined to comment.

Beaver alleges Ingersoll violated so-called “whistleblower” laws protecting employees who disclose allegations of misconduct.

According to the suit, Beaver started work at the assisted-living facility in April 2014, serving as a practical nurse.

The series of events that she says led to her termination, according to the suit, began June 20, 2015, when an unnamed patient reported to her that the fellow nurse had been abusing her.

Beaver knew of a similar report made by the patient previously about the nurse and that no action had been taken in that case, the suit reads.

Beaver also contends that the fellow nurse “had been witnessed treating other patients improperly.” Beaver does not name the fellow nurse in her suit.