New salon fuses art, music and beauty services

Drum chandeliers hang over the long cat-walk table at Music to My Hair. Photo: Kate BunsterDrum chandeliers hang over the long cat-walk table at Music to My Hair. Photo: Kate Bunster

By Kate Bunster
Gazette Reporter
LATHAM — If you’ve driven down Troy-Schenectady Road lately, there’s a good chance you have noticed the big changes taking place in one of the shopping centers along the way.
With the efforts of developer Richard Rosetti, the former Bowlers Club has been transformed into a place to eat, play, and now, get your hair done.
Asad Alkurabi drew inspiration from art and music to come up with the concept for his new hair salon, Music to My Hair. The unique beauty experience doesn’t just stop at the name though — Alkurabi’s thoughtful approach to his business radiates as soon as you walk in the door.

Asad Alkurabi, owner of Music to My Hair. Photo: Kate Bunster

Asad Alkurabi, owner of Music to My Hair. Photo: Kate Bunster

Alkurabi, who has studied cosmetology in numerous places, including Florida, California and Canada, was born in Kuwait and came to the United States when he was 10 years old. After his mother suggested he explore hair school, he decided to go for it and quickly fell in love with the art.
“I started seeing shapes, colors and angles differently,” he said.
The artist was involved with the design and planning of Music to My Hair from the very beginning, when the space was primarily just dirt. The lack of windows didn’t keep Alkurabi from envisioning his new space.
“I always think outside the box. I took a stick and started drawing out my ideas in the dirt.”
The salon is a fusion of all things art, down to the smallest details. One of the first things you will notice when you walk in are two chandeliers made out of drum sets that hang from the ceiling. The 3,500-square-foot space is equipped with custom-made full-body mirrors and special LED lights that allow the stylists to see hair color accurately.
The walls are decorated with the artwork of local artists, which are for sale. In the middle of the room is the color station — a long electric-red catwalk table with black salon chairs, which is available to rent out to get hair and makeup done for special events. In a private nook is a waxing and lash extension station, in addition to a manicure and pedicure room. The design has a luxurious feel to it, while maintaining enough edge for a man to feel comfortable at the barber station.

Alkurabi only stocks and uses products that he believes in on his clients, such as Label.m and Avines. Photo: Kate Bunster

Alkurabi only stocks and uses products that he believes in on his clients, such as Label.m, Davines and Aveda. Photo: Kate Bunster

In the back of the salon is a stage and seating where music and comedy performances will take place. This is where Alkurabi’s vision to merge all of the arts really comes into play.
“I want this to be a place where you feel comfortable to come and hang out,” he said.
Music to My Hair takes a sit-down approach to customer service. At some salons, the customer sits down and the stylist begins cutting with minimal dialogue about the customer’s needs, but Alkurabi begins with a hair consultation.
“I first examine the customer’s face shape, complexion and hair type. Then we come up with a plan together for what they want.”
Alkurabi’s hope is that women will leave his salon feeling more beautiful inside and out, which is something that he takes pride in.
In addition to providing salon services, Music to My Hair hosts cosmetology courses that are open to all.
Alkurabi invited the community to come check out the salon, including artists and musicians.