Want a parrot’s trust? This program is for you

Capital Region Parrot Society member, Sandra Preisman with two of her birds, "Murphy" a 20 year old Quaker Parrot, left, and "Ruby" an EclectusParrot at her home in Niskayuna. (Marc Schultz/Gazette Photographer)Capital Region Parrot Society member, Sandra Preisman with two of her birds, "Murphy" a 20 year old Quaker Parrot, left, and "Ruby" an EclectusParrot at her home in Niskayuna. (Marc Schultz/Gazette Photographer)

BY KELLY DE LA ROCHA
Gazette Reporter

NISKAYUNA — Sandra Preisman’s home is filled with the chirps, whistles and screams of tropical birds.

The raucous chorus includes Ruby, a 17-year-old, purple-and-red eclectus parrot who takes in the world with a wise gaze and has a reputation as a troublemaker.

Then there’s Tralee, a powder blue Indian ringneck parrot who occasionally calls out “peek-a-boo!” and his cage mate, Paula, a 14-year-old green, yellow and red conure with an amazing set of lungs.

Preisman holds Murphy, a 20-year-old, green-and-gray quaker parrot and rubs her neck. The small bird seems to enjoy it.

“You a good girl, Murph?” she asks, and the bird chirps, as if in response.

“Birds can be really cute. They have their antics, they can talk, they can bite. They can scream really loud, so they’re not for everyone,” said Preisman during a visit to her Niskayuna home early Tuesday morning.

As if to confirm that fact, the birds let out a series of cries loud enough to be heard through walls. They make great burglar alarms, Preisman pointed out.

Preisman is vice president of the Capital Region Parrot Society, a nonprofit organization that specializes in bird rescue and adoption. The organization educates members and the public about caring for parrots. Originally a social outlet for bird owners, the group has been around, under various names, since the 1980s.

Read the full story at The Daily Gazette.