Walk-in clinics address need for immediate care

Physician's Assistant Jen McGetrick checks the blood pressure of Robin Davis, of Ballston Spa, right, in an exam room at Scotia-Glenville Family Medicine in Ballston Lake on Tuesday, December 30, 2014. Local primary care practices are seeing a rise of walk-in hours and extended hours for patients. Photo by Patrick Dodson/Gazette PhotographerPhysician's Assistant Jen McGetrick checks the blood pressure of Robin Davis, of Ballston Spa, right, in an exam room at Scotia-Glenville Family Medicine in Ballston Lake on Tuesday, December 30, 2014. Local primary care practices are seeing a rise of walk-in hours and extended hours for patients. Photo by Patrick Dodson/Gazette Photographer

Physician's Assistant Jen McGetrick checks the blood pressure of Robin Davis, of Ballston Spa, right, in an exam room at Scotia-Glenville Family Medicine in Ballston Lake on Tuesday, December 30, 2014. Local primary care practices are seeing a rise of walk-in hours and extended hours for patients. Photo by Patrick Dodson/Gazette Photographer

Physician’s Assistant Jen McGetrick checks the blood pressure of Robin Davis, of Ballston Spa, right, in an exam room at Scotia-Glenville Family Medicine in Ballston Lake on Tuesday, December 30, 2014. Local primary care practices are seeing a rise of walk-in hours and extended hours for patients. Photo by Patrick Dodson/Gazette Photographer

BY BETHANY BUMP
Gazette Reporter

CAPITAL REGION — In this age of immediacy, people ask questions and get answers as fast as their fingers can find a keyboard.

They get groceries delivered to their homes. Automatic refills on their medications. Movies, television shows and music streamed instantly whenever and wherever they like.

It’s probably no surprise, then, that they want their health care just as fast and just as convenient. The most obvious response to this has been the rise in urgent care centers to treat minor but urgent illnesses. But physician practices and medical groups in the Capital Region are also catching on, offering extended hours and allowing walk-in visits during certain time slots to accommodate patients seeking convenience.

“I think there is a growing trend that patients want care when they want it, and it’s our obligation to try to provide as much convenience to patients as we can,” said Jeff Methven, vice president of ambulatory services and chief human resources officer at Saratoga Hospital.

Read the rest of Gazette Reporter Bethany Bump’s story at The Daily Gazette.